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Feeling the slump? 11 tips from a physiotherapist for maintaining health and wellbeing when returning to work

The festive season is over, and with the end of the holidays many Australians will be returning to sitting at a desk for extended periods of time, which research has shown to have a serious impact on well-being. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) is urging employees and employers alike to ensure their health - and the health of their staff - isn’t compromised in the post-Christmas return to the office.

Scrolling the day away

There is strong evidence our screen use is contributing heavily to the amount of time we spend being sedentary. This is because screen time is nearly always associated with sitting or lying down, says Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) paediatric physiotherapist Nicole Pates.

Exercise and funding to combat soaring rates of osteoarthritis

At present, there are more than 2.2 million Australians living osteoarthritis (OA), a joint disease which causes chronic pain, and rates continue to soar.

Pippa Middleton’s post-pregnancy bikini pics come with warning from health professionals

Australian Physiotherapy Association women’s health group chairwoman Cath Willis said though Ms Middleton provided a good example of the benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women should focus on getting enough rest and establishing a good breast milk supply.

Your kids are on holidays, but that doesn’t mean their physical activity should be too

With school officially out and summer holiday freedom stretching for several weeks ahead, the lure of screen time for kids is especially strong. However, low physical activity for extended periods can wreak havoc on children’s health and wellbeing. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) is urging parents to ensure that while their children are on holidays, their physical activity levels don’t also go on a break.  

Catherine Etty-Leal on 5CC radio discussing keeping fit in the New Year

Catherine Etty-Leal, APA musculoskeletal physiotherapist says “Some injuries that are common in people hitting the gym after a long period of inactivity are back pain, pulled muscles and tendinopathy – all of which can quickly put a stop to your New Year’s resolutions, no matter how good your intentions may be.”

New Year’s health resolutions – how to maintain momentum without getting injured

New Year is a time many Australians make resolutions to get fitter, lose weight, eat better and reduce their drinking – but all too often injury and dwindling motivation mean those resolutions can quickly fall by the wayside. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) has some tips to help Aussies pursue and maintain their health goals safely in 2019. 

The understated benefits of plogging

The Scandinavians have worked their inventive magic again, coming up with an ingenious new fitness offering that also happens to be good for the planet. Known as “plogging” – from a combination of “plocka upp” (Swedish for picking up) and jogging – the new get-hip-while-you-get-fit craze involves picking up rubbish while you jog.

Department of Health listens to APA on use of limited registration physios working under ACFI

After hearing the strong arguments presented by the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) the Department of Health has clarified its position on the use of limited registration physiotherapists working under ACFI* items 12.4 a and 12.4 b in the aged care sector.

Department backflips on ACFI pain ruling

The health department has withdrawn recent advice concerning allied health professionals with limited registration and pain management services in aged care while it consults with the sector.

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