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Tradies take care of their tools more than they take care of their health, study reveals

A new study reveals that tradies are almost twice as likely to take care of their tools than their health despite having one of the highest injury rates of any occupation. The Empirica Research commissioned by the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) was released on Wednesday to mark the launch of Tradies National Health Month.

No tradies, being in pain is not part of your job!

Most people are aware that being a tradie is a physically demanding job, but most of us don't realise how much of a battering tradies actually take during their day-to-day work lives.

Research shows tradies take better care of their tools than their health

Aussie tradies are almost twice as likely to take good care of their tools as their bodies despite having one of the highest injury rates of any occupation according to research by the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) released today to mark the launch of Tradies National Health Month.

GPs and physiotherapists – teaming up to fight chronic pain

National Pain Week has been designed to shine a spotlight on the needs of people who are experiencing chronic pain. That pain experience is very complex and different for everyone, presenting an inextricable entanglement of body and mind. ‘Our perception of pain can depend on its context,’ Dianne Wilson, Chair of the Australian Physiotherapy Association’s National Pain Group, told newsGP.

Pain put in the spotlight

Health care professionals in the NT are urging Territorians to include physiotherapy in their pain management programs as part of National Pain Week, which runs from July 23-29.

The ‘invisible’ but chronic health issue

One in three Australians aged 65 and over is affected daily by chronic pain, according to a survey conducted by Chronic Pain Australia (CPA). Chronic pain is Australia’s third most costly health burden, the leading cause of early retirement, and costs the economy more than $34 billion per year, the survey says.

Rest is not ‘just what the doctor ordered’ for chronic pain

Advice to rest and avoid pain has traditionally been given to people with chronic pain. However, research linking lower back pain in teens with work absenteeism as adults points to the need to tackle pain early, eliminating fear-avoidance behaviour later in life. During National Pain Week (23–29 July) the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) is highlighting the effectiveness of physiotherapy in pain management programs.

Why Some Experts Are Saying Perfect Posture Is A Myth

Remember being reprimanded as a child for slouching? Parents and teachers would instruct us so often to sit up straight that it became a deeply ingrained belief slouching would inevitably lead to back problems.

Exercise could be the key to ending lower back pain

Two years ago, Eleanor Gair struggled to sit in an armchair and get up due to severe lower back pain - now she's mostly pain free.

MYTH BUSTED: Exercise isn't harmful for people with knee osteoarthritis

Advice to rest and avoid pain is commonly provided to people with knee and other joint pains - advice that is often wrong, and harmful.

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