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Scrolling the day away

There is strong evidence our screen use is contributing heavily to the amount of time we spend being sedentary. This is because screen time is nearly always associated with sitting or lying down, says Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) paediatric physiotherapist Nicole Pates.

Your kids are on holidays, but that doesn’t mean their physical activity should be too

With school officially out and summer holiday freedom stretching for several weeks ahead, the lure of screen time for kids is especially strong. However, low physical activity for extended periods can wreak havoc on children’s health and wellbeing. The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) is urging parents to ensure that while their children are on holidays, their physical activity levels don’t also go on a break.  

SA Health warning for bouncing babies

BABY walkers and exercise jumpers shuold be avoided because of the risk of injury and developmental delay for babies, health experts warn.

Jolly Jumpers and baby walkers should be avoided, SA Health and experts warn

Parents are being urged not to buy baby walkers and exercise jumpers for their babies because of the risk of injury and developmental delays.

Research giving babies a heads up

Child physiotherapist Elizabeth Williams spends much of her time working to improve the lives of youngsters.

Brooke Patterson discusses the rise in ACL injuries for girls aged 10-19

 New data released by medibank shows that since 2012 girls aged 10-19 have had a 31 per cent increase in ACL repairs. Looking at girls between 10-14, there's been a 52 per cent increase. It is thought this rise is partly due to more girls playing contact sports.

Healthy from the start: 10 fun ideas for getting kids active

According to a 2016 report released by Active Healthy Kids Australia, they may be spending more time in front of a screen – and less time outdoors – than you think. The research group gave Australian kids a shockingly low grade – D minus – for physical activity. (Other lazybones include the UK, Canada, and the United States.)

Carrying backpacks doesn’t cause back pain in children and teenagers

Children and adolescents who carry backpacks aren’t at higher risk of developing back pain, according to a study published today in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM). Researchers found no evidence to suggest a link between carrying a heavy backpack and back pain in these age groups.

WA junior sports urged to tone down contact for fear of lifelong injuries

Junior sport is taking a heavy toll on WA children, with a landmark report showing a rise in injuries and doctors warning that kids as young as 10 are undergoing knee reconstructions and other surgery.

Want your kids to do well this year? Get them physically active!

Getting kids away from screens and being physically active is not only good for their mental and physical health, it also boosts their academic prowess.

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