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Employers exposed to work-from-home injury claims, say lawyers

Ominously, early warning signs are already there, as physiotherapists are reporting more complaints of sore backs and necks due to poorly set up home offices.

Tradies leading the nation’s infrastructure & building recovery need to look after their most valuable asset – their health

Trade work across the construction and home building sectors has been relatively unscathed by the COVID-19 downturn compared to many other sectors.

  • May 11 2020

A step-by-step guide to ensuring your home office isn't injuring your body

Of those who have been fortunate enough to be able to work remotely during the pandemic, chances are your home was not quite prepared to become your full-time office. Whether you’re tapping away at that desk you panic-bought, you’re sitting at the kitchen table with the kids or you’re sneaking off to the couch, physiotherapist Luke Pickett says it’s important to consider how you are positioning your body.

Physiotherapy study aims to improve upper limb mobility for stroke survivors

Losing the ability to use the arm and hand is a devastating outcome for many stroke survivors. Dr Hayward, a researcher in the Department of Physiotherapy at Melbourne University and at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, says up to 70 per cent of stroke survivors have problems using their arm and hand after stroke, making simple tasks like showering, typing an email or making a cup of coffee very difficult. 

Urging tradies to talk about mental health, stretching, and care

Just one in four tradies feel comfortable talking to co-workers about a mental health issue affecting their work — but one in two are happy chatting about their physical health woes, shows new research.

The tradie injury report

There's no denying that tradies are tough - but along with hard yakka comes a high risk of injury, which is why tradies are being urged to be more health-aware this August during Tradies Health Month.

Tradies still value tools more than health, but attitudes are changing

A national survey shows for the second consecutive year that tradies are more likely to take better care of their tools than their physical or mental health.

Being a tradie can be a health hazard

The Australian Physiotherapy Association is warning of a burgeoning tradie health crisis, revealing that tradies account for 60 per cent of all injury and musculoskeletal problems across all workers and 39 per cent of all medical conditions.

Research shows tradies are getting healthier, but blokey culture still exists

Seven out of 10 tradies consider themselves fit and try to eat healthily - challenging the pie eating, chocolate milk drinking stereotype - but a persistent blokey culture is leading to serious injury. The Australian Physiotherapy Association’s annual survey, released today to mark Tradies National Health Month, revealed some concerning attitudes amongst tradies and a disconnect between their attitudes to work and sport.   

Tradies make health the most important part of tool kit

Australia’s trade industry continues to have among the highest health and safety issues of any sector. Time off work due to poor health and injury has a significant impact on families, businesses and communities

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